Blog

Leaps of Faith: Under Water

Leaps of Faith: Under Water

In March, 2017, The Sun Magazine included my flash nonfiction “Under Water” in its “Reader’s Write” column.  The theme?  Leaps of faith.

An audio version of my work was included in a podcast for AIRSLA (Automated Internet Reading Service of Los Angeles, www.airsla.org), a non-profit organization that provides online podcasts of news, information, and entertainment for those who are sight-impaired or reading-impaired.

It’s a lovely rendering of my words (even if my name is mispronounced).  Take a listen; I hope you like it.

Reading About: the writer’s focus

Reading About: the writer’s focus

“The working artist will not tolerate trouble in her life because she knows trouble prevents her from doing her work. The working artist banishes from her world all sources of trouble. She harnesses the urge for trouble and transforms it in her work.”

“Self doubt can be an ally.  This is because it serves as an indicator of aspiration. It reflects love, love of something we dream of doing, and desire, desire to do it. If you find yourself asking yourself (and your friends), ‘Am I really a writer? Am I really an artist?’ chances are you are.”

The counterfeit innovator is wildly self-confident. The real one is scared to death.”

— Steven Pressfield

Buy on Amazon

Reading About: the writer’s mind

Reading About: the writer’s mind

“It still comes as a shock to realize that I don’t write about what I know, but in order to find out what I know. Is it possible to convey the enormous degree of blankness, confusion, hunch, and uncertainty lurking in the act of writing? When I am the reader, not the writer, I too fall into the lovely illusion that the words before me which read so inevitably, must also have been written exactly as they appear, rhythm and cadence, language and syntax, the powerful waves of the sentences laying themselves on the smooth beach of the page one after another faultlessly.

But here I sit before a yellow legal pad, and the long page of the preceding two paragraphs is a jumble of crossed-out lines, false starts, confused order.  A mess.  The mess of my mind trying to find out what it wants to say.  This is a writer’s frantic, grabby mind, not the poised mind of a reader waiting to be edified or entertained.”

—  from I Could Tell You Stories: Sojourns in the Land of Memory by Patricia Hampl

Buy on Amazon
© 2017 kathy * writes